Myanmar (Burma)

  • A family who have benefited from The Leprosy Mission's work in Myanmar

Transformation and renewal in Eastern Shan

The project, part funded by Tearfund, is increasing the quality of life, community participation and the socio-economic status of persons affected by leprosy and disability. This is being achieved by providing medical care, health training and education on leprosy. Schools are also being built in partnership with other agencies to increase educational achievement in children. In 2016, a GOAC grant helped improve access to water, power, sanitation and education in 13 leprosy villages, building 4 schools, 220 latrines and installing two mini-hydropower electricity units and two gravity flow water systems.

Integrated Rehabilitation and Improved Access

Fifteen Disability Resource Centres and drop-in centres have provided physical rehabilitation through physiotherapy to overcome disabilities, as well as counselling and emotional support. Over 100 rural communities are supported. The project has so far helped more than 1,500 people affected by leprosy and their families, including about 150 leprosy patients who have undergone reconstructive surgery. This project was co-funded by Effect:Hope and TLM Netherlands. It will now include greater involvement from the local church, supporting some churches to take responsibility for running disability resource centres.

Essential leprosy services

This project based at Mawlamyine Hospital is assisting approximately 4,000 people affected by leprosy in southern Myanmar to obtain prompt, affordable and effective treatment to prevent worsening disability. As well as providing reconstructive surgery it also has a self-care programme. Through the project, new cases of leprosy are being assessed, treated and followed-up to ensure high levels of the completion of multidrug therapy. A new business plan is being developed to improve the sustainability of the hospital and the improvement of hospital governance is being supported.

SLICE

This project, funded in partnership with Tearfund, will increase the quality of life, community participation and the socio-economic status of people affected by leprosy and disability. This is being achieved by providing medical care, health training and education on leprosy. In 2016, a Guernsey Overseas Aid & Development Commission grant helped improve access to water, power, sanitation and education in 13 leprosy villages, building four schools, 220 latrines and installing two mini-hydropower electricity units and two gravity flow water systems. The project will now focus on working with church and theological colleges to help promote integral mission, as well as mobilising communities to lead their own development.